Research papers

Anita Gurumurthy and Nandini Chami authored two issue papers for Association for Progressive Communication's research series on 'Internet and ICTs for social justice and development'

MHRD released a draft note on 'Public Private Partnership in school education' in October 2009.

As a part of the “Research on Open Educational Resources for Development” project, ITfC conducted an action research on a collaborative OER adoption

The paper attempts to posit a feminist theoretical framework adequate to this complexity, as a signpost for progressive legal-institutional responses. It argues that rather than piece-meal alterations to the existing law, the paradigmatic shifts ushered in by the digital, justify investing in a new law for technology-mediated violence against women (TMVAW).

In April 2017, IT for Change with support from the International Development Research Centre, Canada is initiating a multi-country research study to map the key issues/concerns for the rights and inclusion agenda, stemming from pervasive platformisation, in three key domains – economy, knowledge and governance. Through a detailed analysis of digital platforms in these three domains across 8 country-contexts, the project seeks to garner insights about key policy implications for critical areas of governance, such as :
- access to knowledge,
- access to data,

IT for Change is spearheading a multi-country research study on ICT mediated citizen engagement and its impact on governance structures and processes.

World-over, technology mediated violence against women is growing to be a serious social problem. Women’s full and free participation in digital spaces presupposes a safe online environment, but going online seem to be fraught with the risk of violence for women. Governments, especially in countries in the global South, are yet to bring their laws and institutions up-to-speed, to effectively respond to this issue.

Our discussion paper on the issue of technology-mediated violence against women analyses the adequacy of the current legal and institutional frameworks in India and proposes alternate models that need to be debated and analysed. The paper raises a series of questions on overhauling the existing legal framework, effectively addressing intermediary liability and strengthening law enforcement and other institutional mechanisms.